Mark Monmonier

Selections

Books
"a milestone in the historical study of twentieth-century cartography” – Journal of Historical Geography
“His irrepressible wit shines . . .” – Imago Mundi
"unexpectedly engrossing . . . overcomes all Weather Channel wonkery as a charmingly executed slice of Americana." – Publishers Weekly
"Well written, engaging, mildly provocative, quirky at times.” – H-Net Reviews in the Humanities & Social Sciences
"An informative and entertaining read on climate change via the science of cartography." – Weatherwise
"Engaging . . . a trove of giggle-inducing lore." – Publishers Weekly
"A rewarding study of mapmaking and the uses of maps" – Scientific American
"Engaging, even-handed introduction to the dark side of mapping technology" – Physical Science Digest
"An artful and a funny book, which like any good map packs plenty in a little space." – Scientific American
"Clever title, rewarding book." – Scientific American
How maps help people avoid and officials plan for disasters.
Scholarly Screeds
Published on ResearchGate.net (11 January 2016) and Academia.edu (13 January 2016), DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3332.7126.
Published on ResearchGate.net and Academia.edu, 17 January 2016, DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1235.5605.
Glimpse: the art + science of seeing, no. 8 (Autumn 2011): 14-21.
Weiner Schriften zur Geographie und Kartographie [Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung der Universität Wien], 2004

"Critiquing Critical Cartography"

“A Critique of Critical Cartography,” published on ResearchGate.net (11 January 2016) and Academia.edu (13 January 2016), DOI: 10.13140/​RG.2.1.3332.7126.


According to Google’s Ngram Viewer, which tracks words and phrases in works scanned for the Google Books Library Project, the phrase “critical cartography” emerged in the early 1960s as a metaphor for the careful scrutiny of diverse propositions unrelated to conventional maps and mapping. | A headnote to this short essay describes how my contribution was solicited by the editor of a collection of essays but later rejected by an imperious series editor. The book editor apologized for not letting me know earlier and volunteered, “your contribution was just excellent and would have made the book a richer volume."