Mark Monmonier

Selections

My Current Project
“What if I told you that behind every great map is a network and behind every great network is a map?”
Books
“Thoroughly researched, well written, and richly illustrated with original patent drawings.” – Judith Tyner
“a milestone in the historical study of twentieth-century cartography” – Journal of Historical Geography
“His irrepressible wit shines . . .” – Imago Mundi
“unexpectedly engrossing . . . overcomes all Weather Channel wonkery as a charmingly executed slice of Americana.” – Publishers Weekly
“Well written, engaging, mildly provocative, quirky at times.” – H-Net Reviews in the Humanities & Social Sciences
“An informative and entertaining read on climate change via the science of cartography.” – Weatherwise
“Engaging . . . a trove of giggle-inducing lore.” – Publishers Weekly
“A rewarding study of mapmaking and the uses of maps.” – Scientific American
“Engaging, even-handed introduction to the dark side of mapping technology.” – Physical Science Digest
“An artful and a funny book, which like any good map packs plenty in a little space.” – Scientific American
“Clever title, rewarding book.” – Scientific American
How maps help people avoid and officials plan for disasters.
Encyclopedia Entry
Article in The International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth, Environment, and Technology (2017).
Scholarly Screeds
Published on ResearchGate.net (11 January 2016) and Academia.edu (13 January 2016), DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.3332.7126.
Published on ResearchGate.net and Academia.edu, 17 January 2016, DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1235.5605.
Glimpse: the art + science of seeing, no. 8 (Autumn 2011): 14-21.
Weiner Schriften zur Geographie und Kartographie [Institut für Geographie und Regionalforschung der Universität Wien], 2004

Connections and Content: Networks in the History of Cartography

This book explores the multiple relationships of maps and networks, including
• the triangulation networks used to establish the baselines that set a map’s scale;
• the astronomical observations, ellipsoids, geodetic arcs, telegraph networks, and GPS constellations used to establish latitude and longitude at control stations;
• the cartographic symbols that portray network features on maps;
• the survey networks used to situate and construct canals, railways, roads, and power lines;
• the postal and electronic networks used to create and disseminate weather maps; and
• the topological networks that underlie modern census enumeration and satellite navigation systems.

Click under Writings for more.